3D scanning technology powered
for even the finest of features.

MICROSCOPICALLY RESOLVING FINGERPRINTS IN 3D

 

IDloop’s CFS flats scanner uses optical 3D technology to capture the microscopic ridge and valley structures of the human finger. Our motion compensation algorithm even allows for the capture of shaking or moving hands or objects.

A projector illuminates the fingerprints with structured patterns of blue light, then, a camera records the deformed patterns. This process allows for the capture of a highly detailed 3D point cloud of the fingerprint. Ultimately, the images are converted into 2D equivalents for compatibility with existing AFIS databases. This process involves a tuned bio-physical model that reproduces the physical process of pressing a finger onto a solid surface, resulting in exemplary matching performances.

Using the CFS flats scanner does not require expensive additional computer hardware or software. The complete process runs inside our highly integrated device, at more than 10 frames per second. As a result, a high-quality image can be achieved in under 100 ms.

CFS flat

Key features

Rapid 3D fingerprint scans

by utilizing structured light

High accuracy – even with motion

for quality-captures of fingers and hands

Seamless integration

within the current infrastructure for verification and identification

Rapid 3D fingerprint scans

by utilizing structured light

High accuracy – even with motion

for quality-captures of fingers and hands

Seamless integration

within the current infrastructure for verification and identification

 Structured light
3D point cloud
2D converted Image
2D converted
P
  • 10 µm depth resolution
  • 13-point cloud captures per second
  • More than 5 million 3D points per capture
P
  • Clearly differentiable peaks and valleys
  • No false minutiae
  • No scale ambiguity
P
  • No perspective distortions
  • Fine resolution allows for visibility of sweat pores

CURRENT FINGERPRINT BIOMETRICS TECHNOLOGY

 

Fingerprints, on the tips of human (and other mammal) hands, consist of raised papillary ridges that form unique and intricate patterns. These ridges are formed in loops, whorls, or arches. Areas where the ridges end, bifurcate, or intersect create specific areas called minutiae points. Papillary ridge patterns develop in the womb and are constant, despite finger growth, over the lifetime of an individual.

Fingerprints were traditionally recorded using paper and ink, but most current biometric solutions are contact-based digital fingerprint scanners. Current fingerprint scanners require the finger to be placed on or rolled across a platen. Wet, dry, or damaged fingers and scanner condition may influence capturing process and accuracy.

Contactless fingerprint scanning methods are growing increasingly popular to avoid the disadvantages of touching a surface. Today, the most common contactless methods are 2D photographs of fingerprints captured by a smartphone camera. While smartphone solutions are convenient and fast to use, they have poor image quality. The raw image contrast of smartphone solutions is very low and the enhanced and processed images do not always represent the actual fingerprint. This method can result in false minutiae and thereby negatively compromise the matching performance.

The image below is taken from a smartphone camera and it can only capture a 2D image of a fingerprint. The image quality, when enhanced, deteriorates.

 

J. Libert et al.: NIST Special Publication 500-305, Guidance for Evaluating Contactless Fingerprint Acquisition Devices

IDloop GmbH
Moritz-von-Rohr-Straße 1a
07745 Jena | Germany

contact@IDloop.com

+49 (0)3641 55405 0

Imprint

Privacy Policy

Social Media

GET IN TOUCH